Update: BLM, CAL FIRE suspend burn permits

BLM news release

BISHOP, Calif. – The Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office has issued seasonal fire restrictions for BLM-managed public lands in the Eastern Sierra effective Monday, July 1, due to increased wildland fire danger in the region. The restrictions will remain in effect until November 1, or until wildland fire conditions on public lands in the region improve.

Fire officials estimate that nearly 90 percent of wildland fires affecting BLM-managed public lands in California during the last decade have been human caused. Individuals who spark wildfires, intentionally or unintentionally, may be held responsible for fire suppression and property damage costs. Officials encourage the public to be extremely careful when recreating outdoors, to carry a shovel and water at all times, and to check weather forecasts and fire danger conditions before leaving home.

The following restrictions will remain in place until the risk of wildland fire in the Eastern Sierra subsides:

  • No campfires, charcoal or wood barbeques, or similar open flame fires, except within a designated campsite with a fire ring or fire pit specifically provided for such use in the following developed campgrounds: Tuttle Creek Campground, Goodale Creek Campground, Horton Creek Campground, Crowley Lake Campground and Pleasant Valley Pit Campground. Portable stoves burning gas, jelled petroleum or pressurized liquid fuel are allowed outside of developed campgrounds when used in accordance with a valid California Campfire Permit, available free at all BLM, Forest Service and Cal Fire offices or at www.preventwildfireca.org/Permits.
  • No tools powered by internal combustion engines off established roads, trails or parking areas (such as chainsaws or lawn mowers).
  • No smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, or within the developed campgrounds listed above, or while stopped within an area at least five feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
  • No motorized vehicles off established roads, trails or parking areas.
  • Target shooters may not use incendiary, exploding, tracer, steel core or armor piercing ammunition. Shooting at steel or exploding targets that could emit sparks is not allowed. Target shooters must have a shovel or fire extinguisher on hand. Hunters may use steel shot and other non-lead ammunition as required by California State Law.
  • No fireworks, including “safe and sane” fireworks.
  • No welding or operating an acetylene or other torch with open flame, except by special permit.
  •  No use of explosives, except by special permit.

BLM-managed public lands subject to these fire restrictions extend from the southern Owens Valley in Inyo County, north to Topaz Lake and the Nevada border in Mono County. These fire restrictions also apply to popular BLM-managed recreational areas in the region including the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area, Inyo Mountains Wilderness, Volcanic Tableland, Long Valley, Adobe Valley, Mono Basin, Bodie Hills and Slinkard Valley. BLM seasonal fire restrictions for the Eastern Sierra Region are being implemented in close coordination with Cal Fire (https://www.facebook.com/1663811310523258/posts/2419842918253423?sfns=mo).

The BLM is committed to keeping public landscapes healthy and productive by working closely with cooperating agencies, neighboring communities, and public land visitors to prevent wildland fires. To learn how you can do your part to prevent wildland fires visit www.readyforwildfire.org. A listing of fire restrictions throughout BLM California is available at https://go.usa.gov/xmUEG. For specific questions, please contact the Bishop Field Office at 760-872-5000.

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.

-BLM-

Bishop Field Office, 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100, Bishop, CA  93514

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Cal Fire news release

BISHOP – The increasing fire danger posed by the high volume of dead grass and hotter, drier conditions in the region is prompting CAL FIRE to suspend all burn permits for outdoor residential burning within the State Responsibility Area of Inyo and Mono Counties.

This suspension takes effect July 1, 2019 at 8:00AM and bans all residential outdoor burning of landscape debris such as branches and leaves.

The Bishop Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management will implement restrictions to BLM land at the same time. For more information regarding BLM regulations, visit:https://www.blm.gov/office/bishop-field-office .

“Last year was a devastating reminder that the public cannot let their guard down. Together, we must adapt and evolve to be able to withstand the intensity of these fires, keeping in mind, that the only way to mitigate the damage they cause is through preparation,” said Chief Thom Porter, CAL FIRE director. “The dry, hot weather that fueled the massive fires last year will return again this year, so it is up to the
public to be ready.”

CAL FIRE’s Unit Chief for San Bernardino-Inyo-Mono, Glenn Barley said that “last year’s incredibly destructive fire season is a stark reminder to all Californians to be prepared for wildfires.”

The Department may issue restricted temporary burning permits if there is an essential reason due to public health and safety. Agriculture, land management, fire training, and other industrial-type burning may proceed if a CAL FIRE official inspects the burn site and issues a special permit.

The suspension of burn permits for residential landscape debris does not apply to campfires within organized campgrounds or on private property. Campfires may be permitted if the campfire is maintained in such a manner as to prevent its spread to the wildland. A campfire permit can be obtained at local fire stations or online at www.PreventWildfireCA.org .

While outdoor burning of landscape debris by homeowners is no longer allowed, CAL FIRE is asking residents to take that extra time to ensure that they are prepared for wildfires by maintaining a minimum of 100 feet of Defensible Space around every home and buildings on their property and being prepared to evacuate if the time comes.

For additional information on how to create Defensible Space, as well as tips to prevent wildfires, visit www.ReadyForWildfire.org

 

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7 Responses to Update: BLM, CAL FIRE suspend burn permits

  1. Earl Duran July 1, 2019 at 4:36 pm #

    I wonder if we will ever get our Money back from the Illgal Fire Fee, anyone got any information? Share.

     
  2. M. Anderson July 1, 2019 at 8:45 pm #

    I wish that Mono County would stop allowing fireworks to be sold to the general public. They are set off indiscriminately both before and after the 4th. It only takes a spark.

     
    • Short Fuse July 2, 2019 at 7:55 am #

      No way – Americans have a constitutional right to use personal fireworks to start fires, scare the wits out of dogs and cats, kill wildlife, and maim and blind one another.

      You’ll have to pry my sparklers from my cold dead hands, comrade.

       
  3. David Dennison July 2, 2019 at 10:58 am #

    …Short Fuse….LOL !!!!….Sad thing is,if fireworks were outlawed,in the “new America”….trump’s america..that is exactly what some would say….at least 35 % of it’s population would….”my rights,I can do what I want”…the other day on another web-site,I saw where some off-roaders tore-up a wetland meadow up north,and some comments,pretty close to what you stated there,them saying “it’s our wetland and meadow too,to enjoy and have fun with…just because we’re not “tree-hugging Liberals” doesn’t mean we have our rights taken away to do as we please and where we want…it’s our land too ! “..

     
  4. Mono Person July 2, 2019 at 3:31 pm #

    Every party needs a pooper that’s why we invited you, three….

     
  5. David Dennison July 2, 2019 at 7:13 pm #

    ….another thing ….do you realize,most of the time,when these “partiers” set off their annoying fireworks in the middle of the road,it’s usually left a mess for someone else having to clean up the next day or so ?

     
  6. Capro Phage July 9, 2019 at 5:01 am #

    From reading about all the hazards to dogs in Mono County from eating poop, it sounds like you have plenty of it there already.

     

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