Final Jordan Fire update

FROM USFS

Incident Start Date: 6/09/2019   Cause: Lightning   Size: 523 acres   Containment: 60%     

Incident Type: Full Suppression   Vegetation Type: Brush and timber

Agency: Inyo National Forest, U.S.D.A. Forest Service

Resources Assigned: Engines: 1   Helicopters: 6   Crews: 5   Total Personnel: 205

Current Situation: The Inyo National Forest Type 3 Incident Management Organization is managing the Jordan Fire led by Incident Commander Todd McDivitt and Incident Commander Trainee Don Shoemaker.  The Jordan Fire has been determined to have been caused by lightning. The fire has remained at 523 acres for the past two days due to completed fire control lines and reduced fire behavior.

With fire line construction complete, crews continue to extinguish hot spots adjacent to the line with the aid of water dropping helicopters. Continued warm and dry weather cautions fire managers to keep a limited number of firefighters on the fire to guard against increased fire activity. Fire crews no longer required on the Jordan Fire are being flown back to Lone Pine Incident Command Post to start the demobilization process. After showers, clean uniforms and necessary paperwork, crews will be released to head home to rest and prepare for their next assignment.

Logistical support of firefighters is critical to their efficiency, safety and wellness. Equipment like hose, pumps, fittings, fuel cans, and food storage boxes are sent from centralized fire warehouses to the fire base camp then on to the fire lines. Replacement items such as fire-resistant clothing and gloves are available to firefighters when they return to base camp. Batteries, chain saw gas and oil and other expendable supplies along with food and medical supplies are sent out to the spike camps near the fire lines. Every item is ordered, received, dispersed and accounted for by Logistics Section Chief Doug Winn and his staff. Medical Support is provided by Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedics on the fire lines responding to any illness or injury and providing medical supplies like foot powder, sunscreen and medications. Timely and complete logistic support has been critical to meeting the control objectives of the Jordan Fire.

Incident Commander Todd McDivitt said, “I am proud of the hard work and professionalism of the men and women who responded to this early season, high elevation fire. This first major fire of the year in California is a good test of our readiness for what will likely be another long fire season throughout the western United States.” Command of the Jordan Fire will transition to an Inyo National Forest Type 4 organization on Wednesday.

This is the last Update for the Jordan Fire. As needed, any significant information will be posted on the information outlets below.

For the latest information try these sources:

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6384/  Face book: www.facebook.com/inyonf

Twitter: @Inyo_NF

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Jordan Fire Update
June 16, 2019
Media Contact: Kirstie Butler
Kirstie.butler@usda.gov
Jordan Fire Info Line: (760) 920-7149
Incident Start Date: 6/09/2019 Cause: Lightning Size: 523 acres Containment: 40%
Incident Type: Full Suppression Vegetation Type: Brush and timber
Agency: Inyo National Forest, U.S.D.A. Forest Service

Resources Assigned: Engines: 1 Helicopters: 6 Crews: 7 Total Personnel: 246
Current Situation: The Inyo National Forest Type 3 Incident Management Organization is managing the Jordan Fire led by Incident Commander Todd McDivitt and Incident Commander Trainee Don Shoemaker.

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The Jordan Fire has been determined to have been caused by lightning. None of the historic structures at Jordan Hot Springs were lost as a result of this fire.

Control line construction is nearly complete as crews on both sides of the fire have tied their lines into an extensive snowbank below Manzanita Knob. These lines will now be improved to ensure that current and predicted fire behavior will not cause the fire to escape. Percent Containment figures are expected to increase as fire managers gain confidence in the work accomplished on the ground. As the fire edge cools, firefighters will begin the process of fire line rehabilitation to reduce the chance of soil erosion and mitigate the visual appearance of fire suppression activities.

The big job of removing all equipment used to suppress the fire and trash has already begun. Equipment no longer needed by the crews is gathered, carried to the nearest helispot and securely bundled. Helicopters again will be called upon to remove the excess equipment, supplies and trash from the Golden Trout Wilderness. Forest Supervisor Tammy RandallParker said, “Because the Jordan Fire is in a congressionally designated Wilderness the Forest Service strives to utilize the
“minimum tool” concept to get the job done while maintaining the values associated with wilderness areas.”

Kmax

 

The use of modern tools such as helicopters and chainsaws, while efficient, do intrude into the solitude and natural sounds one would expect in a primitive wilderness setting. Special permission by the Forest Supervisor is required for each fire suppression
mission to use these “modern” tools. Another “minimum tool” may be able to be used to reduce the noise and expense of helicopter flights to get the job done.

The Inyo National Forest is home to several award-winning mule pack strings that historically have been used to do the heavy hauling on the east side of the Sierra Nevada. The trails from Jordan Hot Springs to the Sequoia National Forest’s
Black Rock Trailhead are being evaluated to see if they are clear and safe to use for pack stock.

 

High stream levels, waterlogged meadows or fallen trees could block the mule’s access. Depending on trial conditions the mules and their ‘packers’ may be called upon to haul a significant share of the work load that helicopters would otherwise be required to perform. Some of these same mules were showcased in the Rose Parade this year.
For the latest information try these sources:

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6384/ Face book: www.facebook.com/inyonf
Twitter: @Inyo_NF

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SATURDAY UPDATE

Incident Start Date: 6/09/2019   Cause: Lightning   Size: 523 acres   Containment: 30%     

Incident Type: Full Suppression   Vegetation Type: Brush and timber

Agency: Inyo National Forest, U.S.D.A. Forest Service

Resources Assigned: Engines: 1   Helicopters: 6   Crews: 8   Total Personnel: 274

Current Situation: The Inyo National Forest Type 3 Incident Management Organization is managing the Jordan Fire led by Incident Commander Todd McDivitt and Incident Commander Trainee Don Shoemaker.

The Jordan Fire has been determined to have been caused by lightning. None of the historic structures at Jordan Hot Springs were lost as a result of this fire.

Crews continue to make good progress in control line construction on both flanks of the fire up towards Manzanita Knob at 9,121 feet of elevation. Most of yesterday’s fire growth was a result of tactical burning operations firefighters used to remove vegetation between indirect fire lines and the main fire. This provides more depth to the control line and reduces the chances of the fire escaping containment.

The Lone Pine Airport is a busy place these days. It is the temporary home to a small fleet of firefighting helicopters supporting the firefighters on the Jordan Fire.

Helicopters of different sizes and capabilities perform many different missions every day. All the firefighters building control lines, support personnel and fireline leadership were flown into helispots close to the fires edge. All the equipment, supplies, food and water to support over 200 personnel for days at a time arrived by helicopter.

When the fire gets active, helicopters are called upon to dip water out of the Kern River and drop it to cool the fire’s edge. As was needed over the past couple of days, helicopters were called upon to fly ill or injured firefighters to hospitals for advanced medical care. When the fire is controlled, helicopters will again be called upon to haul out personnel, equipment, and trash, reducing the impact of fire suppression activities in the Golden Trout Wilderness.

Air Support Supervisor Stephan Goldstein has responsibility for leadership of aircraft operations for the Jordan Fire and fills a critical role in meeting the control objectives of the incident.  Helibase Manager Matt Quezada directs helicopter operations at the airport from his mobile command trailer orchestrating over 25 missions or flights per day. Support crews, fuel tenders, and dust abatement water trucks move about the airport as needed.

Over the fire, Helicopter Coordinator Craig Hall makes sure that all helicopters safely get to the assigned helispot. Over it all, an Air Attack, in a fixed wing aircraft, adds another layer of observation and safety tracking all aircraft over the fire area.

Temporary flight restrictions warn all pilots from hang gliders to military aircraft, to stay clear of the fire area.

For the latest information try these sources:

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6384/  Face book: www.facebook.com/inyonf

Twitter: @Inyo_NF

 

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