Update: Lions Fire at 4,000 acres, 60 percent contained

USFS news release

Lions Fire Update 7-5-18

The Lions Fire showed no growth yesterday, and continues to be 4,000 acres and 60% contained. Crews remaining on the fire are reinforcing and securing the fireline, in order to ensure that it will hold as conditions become drier and hotter throughout the summer. Higher winds are projected for today and tomorrow, and crews are monitoring for threats to the line or spot fires. There are still unburned pockets of fuel within the unit, which will continue to be consumed in the coming weeks. A small amount of smoke production is likely to continue during this process, without creating significant impacts for nearby communities.

Air quality in Mammoth Lakes and the surrounding areas is expected to continue to be slightly affected by smoke from larger wildfires elsewhere in the state, such as the County Fire in Yolo County, CA. Residents and visitors are advised to limit their exertion outdoors should periods of heavy smoke occur.

As the need for active firefighting decreases, firefighters are reducing the impacts that fire operations have had upon the wilderness character of the area, a process known as “suppression repair.” Techniques may include repairing damaged trails, clearing cut trees and brush, or creating simple drainage structures to prevent erosion.

Located between the footprints of previous fires, the Lions Fire is contributing to diverse and healthy forest ecology. The area will ultimately be more resilient in drought conditions, and better protected against future wildfires.

The following National Forest System Trails near the Lions Fire area have been temporarily closed: Sierra National Forest Trails No. 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E14, 26E56, and 26E46 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction. Trail closures will remain in place until fire management staff determines that it is safe to reopen the area.

Shuttles to Devils Postpile National Monument and Reds Meadow Valley are running, and trails there are open. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open. Visitors should expect smoke impacts of variable intensity.

Due to decreasing fire operations, further updates will be issued only if warranted by a change in conditions.

To learn more about the Lions Fire, visit https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5850/

Air quality forecasts are available at https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab atnps.gov/DEPO

Lions Fire Morning Update 7-3-18

The Lions Fire is currently 3,850 acres and 50% contained. Yesterday’s burn-out operations were effective with good fuel consumption, resulting in strengthened fireline and reduced vegetation and dead and down wood throughout the burned area. Crews plan to complete the remainder of burn-out operations by hand today.

Smoke production from the Lions Fire is expected to be reduced today, and will continue to decrease throughout the coming week. Fires elsewhere in the region may affect air quality in the coming days.

Nearly 20 miles of fire perimeter have been mapped for containment with handline or natural barriers, and air resources have logged approximately 680 flight hours. Operations are drawing down, and several crews and helicopters have been released to respond to other fires, regionally and nationally. Five crews currently remain on the fireline, and are focusing their efforts on the northern part of the fire.

This lightning-caused fire was detected in early June, and is located in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. It is located primarily in the Stairway Creek drainage, north and west of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River.

The following National Forest System Trails near the burned area have been temporarily closed: Sierra National Forest Trails No. 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E14, 26E56, and 26E46 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction, and 2601 from the boundary of the Inyo NF and Devils Postpile National Monument (King Creek Trail). Trail closures will remain in place until fire management staff determines that it is safe to reopen the area for recreational use.

Shuttles to Devils Postpile National Monument and Reds Meadow Valley are running, and trails there are open. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open. Visitors should expect smoke impacts of variable intensity.

Air quality forecasts are available at https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab atnps.gov/DEPO

 

For more information, see https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/news/5850/

 

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4 Responses to Update: Lions Fire at 4,000 acres, 60 percent contained

  1. Tinner July 3, 2018 at 3:48 pm #

    Half the USFS employees should be fired and replaced with discharged military veterans, how’s that for an idea?
    There has been a lot of talk in recent news of overhauling and even abolishing certain government entities, how about an overhaul of the USFS?
    When you think about it military personnel does similar work that the USFS does, only with a more common sense approach and a lot less pay.
    And talk about patrolling our National Parks, I think people will think twice about violating laws that negatively impact the environment in our National Parks if they knew the law enforcement officers on patrol were combat veterans.
    Just my two cents.

     
    • USES budgets July 6, 2018 at 3:51 pm #

      How about just get rid of 50% of them. Most are just sitting behind a desk waiting for their pensions to kick in.
      This fire should never been bigger than 50 acres.

       
  2. David Dennison July 4, 2018 at 12:45 pm #

    Tinner,to be honest,some of that kinda scary what your saying,in a funny way…when I’m out camping on USFS land or National Parks,I like to think I respect the environment doing so,the last thing I’d need or want would be some military combat veteran “on patrol”,thinking he was in charge of me and all things…I respect Military Veterans,but also know some that are hot-heads when given anytype of authority… many of the current USFS employees are collage educated,many years of collage to know and do what they are doing,or at least supposed to…the DFG and USFS Law Enforcement officers,not a lot different than regular Law Enforcement…going to an academy,learning the laws and codes and violations…trained officers…can’t just replace them with others simply because they are discharged military combat veterans.

     
  3. Nancy July 9, 2018 at 9:37 am #

    The guys driving the water trucks filling up at substation road were disgustingly rude foul mouthed idiots. Seems they hate their supervisor. Shame on you

     

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