Thursday update on Lions Fire, smoke advisory and state fire summary

News releases

Lions Fire Update 8/9/18

The Lions Fire is estimated at 8,711 acres with 70% containment, for an increase of 227 acres. There are 178 personnel committed to the fire, including 6 crews, 4 helicopters, and a pack string of mules from the Stanislaus National Forest.

2018-08-09-Sierra-InyoNationalForest-Outlook.20180809151443

The northeast, east, and southern flanks of the fire are contained. All burning activities on northeast flank are completed.

Crews remain focused on creating containment lines along the southwest flank, where the fire has been active for the past several days challenging containment lines with wind driven growth. Crews are completing direct and indirect hand line in an effort to keep the fire from crossing the North Fork of the San Joaquin River using trail networks and natural barriers where possible. Along the northwest flank, the fire is moving into sparse fuels and cliffs.

Yesterday’s observed fire activity included moderate fire behavior with single tree torching, backing, and some uphill growth. This area has 50% tree mortality from bark beetles and drought in this area. These conditions, along with blowdown from a 2011 wind event, have contributed to a buildup of heavy fuels, creating difficult fire fighting conditions.

Hot and dry conditions remain in the forecast with light southwest winds expected for today, and gusty winds in the afternoon. There is a significant warming and drying trend predicted for this week. Isolated thunderstorms are expected to begin near the fire as early as Friday.

The Reds Meadow Road and all services in the Reds Meadow Valley, including Devils Postpile National Monument and Rainbow Falls, remain open.

Closures: There is an emergency trail closure for the Fern Lake and Beck Lake Trails on the Inyo National Forest and emergency trail closures and a Forest Order to close the area on the Sierra National Forest (west of the North Fork of the San Joaquin River, north of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River and South of Iron Creek).

Smoke: See the smoke outlook report or visit https://airnow.gov/

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Smoke Advisory

Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control District

Smoke Sources: Donnell Fire, Ferguson Fire, and Lions Fire

Air Quality Health Advisory: Stage 2 in Alpine County and northern Mono County, and Stage 1 in southern Mono County.

Based on air pollution levels in Woodfords and Coleville a Stage 2 Air Pollution Health Advisory is in effect throughout the day on August 9, 2018 in Alpine County and northern Mono County. Based on air pollution levels in Mammoth Lakes, a Stage 1 Advisory is in effect in southern Mono County. Periods of heavy smoke and clearing may fluctuate during the day depending on wind patterns, though the Blue Sky model predicts air quality to worsen this afternoon and evening. Visit www.gbuapcd.org for near real time conditions.

For more information on ways to protect yourself from wildfire smoke, click here.

A Stage 2 Health Advisory recommends that everyone refrain from strenuous outdoor activities in the impacted area.

A Stage 1 Health Advisory recommends children, the elderly, people with heart or lung problems, or people with current illnesses such as the flu, to stay indoors and avoid strenuous outdoor activities in the impacted areas

AirFire maps are currently not displaying the CARB Emergency Monitors, so a good alternate AQI map is here.

Woodfords

Coleville

Bridgeport

Lee Vining

June Lake

Mammoth Lakes

US Forest Service PM2.5 Monitor deployed in Mammoth Lakes

US Forest Service PM2.5 Monitor deployed in Crowley Lake

Smoke conditions may change quickly. If you have any questions please visit: www.gbuapcd.org or call the Great Basin Air Pollution Control District office in Bishop at 760-872-8211 during regular business hours.

Health advisories on the web: https://gbuapcd.org/AirMonitoringData/HealthAdvisories/

More Information: Ferguson Fire InciWeb Page, Donnell Fire InciWeb Page and Lions Fire InciWeb Page

Information on all smoke events being monitored in the District: https://gbuapcd.org/smoke/

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Thursday, August 9, 2018
Over 13,000 firefighters are on the front lines of 12 large wildfires across California. To date, these fires have burned nearly 667,000 acres and damaged or destroyed over 2,000 structures. Firefighters continue to make progress on containment lines and many evacuations have been lifted, reducing the number of evacuees to 4,400 residents.
A Red Flag Warning is in effect of many parts of northern California, including portions of the Carr Fire and Mendocino Complex, through Saturday night. Above normal temperatures continue across most of the state, accompanied by low humidity and windy conditions, particularly in the Red Flag Warning areas. The potential for thunderstorms remains the southern desert.
Even though you completed your defensible space, or even if you didn’t get to all of it, there are some things you need to keep up on to help give your home a fighting chance when a wildfire strikes! Clear your roof and gutters of leaves, pine needles and other tree debris. Sweep and rake around your home to remove any dead yard waste and remove dead plants. Clean decks and patios to remove anything that could potentially ignite from an ember. For more on things you can do, click here.
Fires of Interest:
Carr Fire, Shasta County (more info…)
Whiskeytown & Redding
•  177,450 acres, 48% contained
•  Evacuations and road closures in place
•  1,300 residents evacuated
• 1,077 residences destroyed, 191 residences damaged
•  Carr is the 6th most destructive fire, 13th most deadly and is now 12th largest fire in state history
•  CAL FIRE Incident Management Team 1 (Gouvea) in unified command withCity of Redding FD (Kreider) USFS (Pechota)
Mendocino Complex, Mendocino/Lake County
• 304,402 total acres, 51% contained
• 119 residences destroyed, 12 residences damaged
• 2,000 residents under evacuation orders
• The Mendocino Complex fire is the largest wildfire in state history
• CAL FIRE Incident Management Team 2 (Kavanaugh) in unified command withNORCAL IMT-1 (McGowan)
River Fire (more info…)
Hopland
• 48,920 acres, 84% contained
Ranch Fire (more info…)
Ukiah
• 255,482 acres, 48% contained
• Evacuations and road closures in place
Holy Fire, Orange County (more info…)
Holy Jim Canyon, Cleveland National Forest
•  9,614 acres, 5% contained
•  Structures threatened
Bridge Fire, Marin County **NEW**
Olema
• 45 acres, 80% contained
Murphy Fire, Plumas County
• 117 acres brush, timber, 0% contained
Ferguson Fire, Mariposa County (more info…)
Yosemite National Park
• 95,104 acres, 79% contained
• Evacuations and road closures remain in effect
• CA Fed IMT-3 (von Tillow) in command
Cranston Fire, Riverside County (more info…)
Hemet
•  13,139 acres, 96% contained
Donnell Fire, Tuolumne County (more info…)
Near Hwy 108, Donnell Lake area
•  21,097 acres, 6% contained
Georges Fire, Inyo County (more info…)
Lone Pine
•  2,883 acres, 70% contained
Valley Fire, San Bernardino County (more info…)
Yucaipa
•  1,350 acres, 56% contained
Natchez Fire, Del Norte County (more info…)
Southeast of Cave Junction, OR
•  11,338 acres, 50% contained
Eel Fire, Mendocino County (more info…) **FINAL**
East of Covelo
• 972 acres, 100% contained
Owens Fire, Mono County **FINAL**
North of Mammoth Lake
•  312 acres
Five Fire, King County **FINAL**
Kettleman Hills Area
•  2,995 acres, 100% contained
Eagle Fire, Modoc County **FINAL**
South of Cedarville
•  2,100 acres
Horse Creek Fire, Tulare County **FINAL**
John Krebs Wilderness Area
•  34 acres
 

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2 Responses to Thursday update on Lions Fire, smoke advisory and state fire summary

  1. Dave Alp August 14, 2018 at 3:49 pm #

    Forest Service employees are spiking their retirement with this fire. Put the damn thing out and quit screwing the pooch.

     
    • Charles O. Jones August 15, 2018 at 5:26 pm #

      @Dave,
      Spiking their retirements? Not sure about the USFS but in the vast majority of public agencies, retirement is calculated on base salary. Overtime does not factor in whatsoever. In other words, there would be no increases to retirement benefits by prolonging these incidents. Do you have info to the contrary?

       

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