Monday update: Lions Fire at 3,400 acres, 15 percent contained

Lions Fire Morning Update 7-2-18

Yesterday’s burn-out operations brought the Lions Fire to 3,575 acres and 35% containment. In a burn-out operation, firefighters introduce fire inside of containment lines and natural barriers, and allow it to move towards the approaching wildfire, thus depriving the approaching wildfire of fuel. Using this technique consumes fuels that otherwise might take much longer to burn and reduces the overall duration of the incident. Burn-out operations continue today on a smaller scale than on previous days.

Smoke impacts in Mammoth Lakes and the surrounding areas are expected to continue throughout the week, but lessen each day as the vegetation and dead and down wood within the fire area continues to burn down.

Fire managers are using aerial resources to support a broad range of operations. Helicopters are transporting firefighters to and from their wilderness spike camps, supplying ground operations, and making water drops to cool the fire perimeter. Helicopters are also being used to perform aerial ignitions during burn-out operations in areas where ground access would be unsafe or inefficient.

This lightning-caused fire was detected in early June, and is located in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. It is located primarily in the Stairway Creek drainage, north and west of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River.

To provide for public and firefighter safety, the following National Forest System Trails near the burned area have been temporarily closed: Sierra National Forest Trails No. 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E14, 26E56, and 26E46 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction, and 2601 from the boundary of the Inyo NF and Devils Postpile National Monument (King Creek Trail).

Shuttles to Devils Postpile National Monument and Reds Meadow Valley are running, and trails there are open. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open. Visitors should expect smoke impacts of variable intensity.

Air quality forecasts are available at https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab atnps.gov/DEPO

For more information, see https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/news/5850/

Lions Fire Morning Update 7-1-18

Today is the fourth day of burn-out operations on the Lions Fire, reducing fuels within the containment lines already constructed by firefighters. These operations are consuming fuels that might otherwise smolder and carry fire for much longer, thus reducing the overall duration of operations and smoke impacts to the community. Aerial ignitions were employed yesterday, and will be employed again today, to ensure safer and more efficient burn-out operations. The fire is 3400 acres, and 15% contained.

Wind patterns are bringing more smoke into Mammoth Lakes and other locations east of the fire. Significant smoke impacts are expected over the next 48 hours, reducing thereafter as the burn down period progresses. Residents are advised to keep windows closed and limit their outdoor activity during periods of heavy smoke.

This lightning-caused fire was detected in early June, and is located in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. It is located primarily in the Stairway Creek drainage, north and west of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River.

To provide for public and firefighter safety, the following National Forest System Trails near the burned area have been temporarily closed: Sierra National Forest Trails No. 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E14, 26E56, and 26E46 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction, and 2601 from the boundary of the Inyo NF and Devils Postpile National Monument (King Creek Trail).

Shuttles to Devils Postpile National Monument and Reds Meadow Valley are running, and trails there are open. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open. Visitors should expect smoke impacts of variable intensity.

The Lions Fire is providing critical fuel reduction, particularly in the area affected by a massive tree blow-down event in 2011, which left as many as 100 large downed trees per acre in a wilderness area with very limited access. This fire reduces the risk of larger, more severe fires in the future.

Air quality forecasts are available at https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab at nps.gov/DEPO

 

Lions Fire Afternoon Update 6-30-18

A shift in wind direction to the northeast, combined with burn-out operations on the interior of the Lions Fire, are resulting in increased smoke this afternoon in Mammoth Lakes and locations to the north and east.

The burn out operations are being conducted to improve and tie together containment lines and reduce heavy fuels in the fire’s interior. Air quality models indicate that, as temperatures cool toward evening, the air flow will drive the smoke away from Mammoth Lakes and it will be mostly clear through the night tonight.

Smoke levels will increase again around noon tomorrow and air quality will likely become unhealthy for sensitive groups. Smoke will continue to be noticeable through the afternoon and evening tomorrow. For the next few days, smoke will be present throughout the day, and more noticeable in the evenings, but as burn-out operations are completed over the next few days, smoke impacts will steadily decrease.

Air quality and smoke forecasts are available at

https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab atnps.gov/DEPO

Lions Fire Morning Update 6-30-18

The Lions Fire is now 3,300 acres with 7% containment. Winds are expected to shift to the northeast today and tonight, and may be gusty at times. Smoke production today should be similar to yesterday but may increase in Mammoth Lakes by tomorrow as winds shift. Crews will continue working on building and securing containment lines primarily along the east edge of the fire, south of Summit Meadow, and the southwest edge where it meets the previously burned area of the Butte Fire. The southeastern edge of the fire is in rugged, inaccessible terrain that rises above the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River and will be secured using aircraft.

The lightning caused fire was detected in early June and is currently burning in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. It is located primarily in the Stairway Creek drainage, north and west of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River.

To provide for public safety and the safety of the firefighters who are engaged in fire suppression and rehabilitation efforts, the following National Forest System Trails have been temporarily closed: Sierra National Forest Trails No. 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E14, 26E56, and 26E46 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction, and 2601 from the boundary of the Inyo NF and Devils Postpile National Monument (King Creek Trail).

Shuttle service to Devils Postpile National Monument is running and trails there remain open. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open at this time. Smoke may be present in some places, though concentrations will vary.

Wildland fire is an integral and necessary part of maintaining a healthy ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada. Fire serves to naturally remove the accumulation of excess wildfire fuel. The Lions Fire will also help diminish the risk of larger, more severe fires in the future. The fire is currently staffed by 349 people, including eight handcrews and seven helicopters. The handcrews are remaining overnight at spike camps around the fire’s perimeter and are being supplied via mules and helicopters.

Air quality and smoke forecasts are available at

https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab atnps.gov/DEPO

Lions Fire Morning Update 6-29-18

Portions of the Lions Fire have burned into areas where the vegetation is less dense and the fire has slowed its progression, though areas of dense fuel remains in the fire’s path. It is now 3,107 acres, having gained just 100 acres since yesterday. Winds are expected to shift to the northeast today and tonight, and may be gusty at times. Crews will continue working on building and securing containment lines primarily along the east edge of the fire, south of Summit Meadow, and the southwest edge where it abuts the previously burned area of the Butte Fire. The southeastern edge of the fire is in rugged, inaccessible terrain that rises above the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River and will be secured using aircraft.

The lightning caused fire was detected in early June and is currently burning in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. It is located primarily in the Stairway Creek drainage, north and west of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River.

All recreational services and areas are open in and around Mammoth Lakes. Shuttle service to Devils Postpile National Monument is running and trails there remain open. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open at this time. Smoke may be present in some places, though concentrations will vary. The following lateral trails leading into the fire area will be closed in the near future: Sierra NF: 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E56, 26E14, and 2646 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction, and 2601 from the boundary of the Inyo NF and Devils Postpile National Monument (King Creek Trail).

Wildland fire is an integral and necessary part of maintaining a healthy ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada. Fire serves to naturally remove the accumulation of excess wildfire fuel. The Lions Fire will also help diminish the risk of larger, more severe fires in the future. The fire is currently staffed by 352 people, including seven handcrews and seven helicopters. The handcrews are remaining overnight at spike camps around the fire’s perimeter and are being supplied via mules and helicopters.

Air quality and smoke forecasts are available at

https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab at nps.gov/DEPO

For more information, see https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/news/5850/

Lions Fire Morning Update 6-28-18

Overnight the Lions Fire spread only slightly to the southwest and is now at 3,007 acres. Winds are expected to be lighter today which may help firefighters with their containment efforts. The fire is now 5% contained. Crews continue working on building and securing containment lines primarily along the eastern and southwest edges.

The lightning caused fire was detected in early June and is currently burning in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. It is located primarily in the Stairway Creek drainage, north and west of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River.

A community meeting is scheduled for tonight, Thursday, June 28, at the US Forest Service Auditorium located across the pavilion from the Mammoth Lakes Welcome Center, 2510 Main St, at 6:00 pm. Interested members of the public and media are encouraged to attend. Fire management staff will be present to answer questions.

All lodging and recreational services are open in Mammoth Lakes and Devils Postpile National Monument. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open at this time. The following lateral trails leading into the fire area will be closed in the near future: Sierra NF: 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E56, 26E14, and 2646 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction, and 2601 from the boundary of the Inyo NF and Devils Postpile National Monument (King Creek Trail).

Wildland fire, just as wind and weather, has helped shape the beauty of the Sierra Nevada and is an integral and necessary part of the ecosystem. The Lions Fire will help diminish the risk of future fires in the area being larger, more destructive, and harder to control. The fire is currently staffed by 330 people, including seven handcrews and seven helicopters. The handcrews are remaining overnight at camps around the fire’s perimeter and are being supported by mules and helicopters.

Air quality and smoke forecasts are available at

https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and the alert tab at nps.gov/DEPO

 

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USFS news release

Lions Fire Evening Update 6-27-18

The Lions Fire, located in the Ansel Adams Wilderness, saw minimal growth today and is now 3002 acres. Started by lightning and detected in early June, the fire is burning in rugged terrain primarily in the Stairway Creek drainage, north and west of the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River.

Photos courtesy of United States Forest Service

Fire activity moderated today as the fire reached previously burned areas and natural barriers. Firefighting efforts were focused on the east and southwest side of the fire today where most of the growth occurred and included handline construction and helicopter water drops.

A community meeting is scheduled for tomorrow, Thursday, June 28, 2018, at the US Forest Service Amphitheater located across the pavilion from the Mammoth Lakes Welcome Center, 2510 Main St, at 6:00 pm. Interested members of the public and media are encouraged to attend. Fire management staff will be present to answer questions.

All lodging and recreational services are open in Mammoth Lakes and Devils Postpile National Monument. The Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail are open at this time.

The following lateral trails leading into the fire area will be closed in the near future: Sierra NF: 26E01 (Mammoth Trail) to the Inyo NF Boundary, 26E56, 26E14, and 2646 from the Inyo NF boundary. Inyo NF trail closures include 26E01 from the Sierra NF to 2601 junction, and 2601 from the boundary of the Inyo NF and Devils Postpile National Monument (King Creek Trail).

Wildland fire, just like wind and water, has helped shape the beauty of the Sierra Nevada and fires like the Lions fire help diminish the risk of future fires being larger, more destructive, and harder to control.

The fire is currently staffed by 330 people, including seven crews of firefighters and eight helicopters.

Air quality and smoke forecasts are available at    _https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

For more information about smoke conditions in the area, visit webcams at www.mammothmountain.com and nps.gov/DEPO

For more information, see https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/news/5850/ or call 760-582-5203.

 

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One Response to Monday update: Lions Fire at 3,400 acres, 15 percent contained

  1. BobM June 29, 2018 at 9:43 am #

    So how much does each water drop cost when all supporting factors are taken into account?

     

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